Going to need to update my posting script now that micro.blog can cross post to threads

(Yes, this is a test post)

Currently reading: How to Be Perfect by Michael Schur 📚

Inside Out 2: Doesn’t really break any new ground, but it’s so helpful to be able to name and visually see these emotions and how ourselves interact with them that I feel like the concept could run forever

Inside Out 2, 2024

Doesn't really break any new ground, but it's so helpful to be able to name and visually see these emotions and how ourselves interact with them that I feel like the concept could run forever

I love the elevation of Juneteenth as a federal holiday and how it provides both a chronological and metaphorical bookend with Independence Day. America may have been established as a nation conceived in liberty, but it took until June 19th, 1865 for this to be realized.

It’s also a good reminder that there’s always more to do to. Freedom isn’t a destination we arrive at or a proclamation to be made, it’s a continuous journey.

America’s long and uneven march from slavery to freedom

Ben Thompson in today’s Stratechery Update on why Adobe’s recent subscription tricks are bad:

I would, generally speaking, prefer less government regulation rather than more, and I think I speak for a lot of people in tech in that regard. Those people in tech, though, need to appreciate the extent to which choices like this one made by Adobe invite exactly that. No, I don’t think this so-called “dark pattern” is that dark, if you take just a second or two to look at the plans on offer; yes, there seems to me to be far more egregious cases that break the law in question much more flagrantly (like publications that make you call to cancel). However, at the end of the day, Adobe wasn’t satisfied with harvesting the natural gains from their dominant market position: they had to make money off of people screwing up too, and it’s hard to feel bad for them facing regulatory action for not doing right by potential customers

This is such a clear articulation of a lot of different things

  • We too often equate sleazy with sinister. Both are bad, but one is an order of magnitude worse. People should be paying more attention, but companies shouldn’t be profiting off the inattention.
  • Regulation is a blunt instrument to stop bad things from happening. If you do sleazy things (that probably don’t warrant regulation), you’re tempting use of that blunt instrument.

The Fall Guy, 2024

When they make movies, I like to imagine they have a dial: turn left to dial back the weirdness, turn right to crank it up.

One of my favorite genre of movies is fairly straightforward action/romance with the weirdness dial cranked to about 8.

Anyway, everyone go see The Fall Guy!

Going to start calling the color of this couch ‘Midnight’

An M2 MacBook Air on a couch that is roughly the same color as

watchOS 11 removes Siri face on Apple Watch

The writing has been on the wall for the Siri face after it wasn’t updated with the new widget system last year.

It never lived up to its promise, but it was great at surfacing things like timers, reminders, game scores, heart rate, alarms, activity rings, weather, now playing, shortcuts, and calendar events without having always-showing complications.

It’s been my watch face since it debuted and there’s nothing even close that can replace it.

Goodbye 'HEY'

As we are wont to do to this day, we were waiting on Jude.

But this time it was 2020 and we were in the hospital in that weird in between time from when you check in to when the baby is born. Julie’s contractions were close enough together for us to be in the delivery room, but not quite close enough to begin delivery.

We were pros, though. We knew the drill. Babies don’t come immediately. We were finishing up some work things, letting people know we were in the hospital, etc. etc. etc.

I was texting with a friend who said he had an invitation to the new email service– HEY– and asked if I wanted one. The username I wanted was open, so I signed up right there in the delivery room. I received my first HEY email before I received my second kid.

I always thought about that day each of the past three HEY renewals: it makes me happy to remember little details like this of Jude’s birth.

I never felt an affinity for HEY like some people did. It was a great idea and a great initial product. There was lot’s of promise, but I never feel like that promise was fully realized. The HEY of 2020 looks and feels very similar to the HEY of 2024.

So I’m cancelling HEY and migrating back to iCloud email– or more precisely, my @mac.com email– for five main reasons:

HEY feels too heavy

This has improved in the past year or so, but it still feels like it takes ten clicks to do anything. I’m constantly waiting on the Mac’s electron app. There’s very little support for trackpad gestures on the Mac. Attachments feels like a chore to manage. For a service that prides itself on turning down the noise of email, it feels like not enough attention has been paid to managing the signal.

HEY feels stagnant

There’s been some improvement to the core ideas, but the pace of new features has crawled. Email may not need constant new features, but a subscription service like HEY does. That puts 37signals in a bind: if they iterate too much on email, it could collapse under itself. But not enough doesn’t feel worth the money. It’s not a great situation to be in.

HEY feels walled off

I get that the schtick of HEY is that while it’s built on an open protocol like email, it has so much special sauce that it’s impossible to import all your old email or work in third-party email clients. But with 37signals preference for and commitment to the web, it feels like HEY should be as open and integrate with as much as possible and it just doesn’t. 37signals wants me to use HEY for everything, but I like my other apps! What if I could connect my email to my Things today list or utilize the Drafts app for notes on an email?

When HEY Calendar launched with no intention of being able to manage existing calendars, it sealed the deal for me: it’s 37signals way or the highway. That’s not a bad thing if you’re going 37signals way, but there’s not much deviation allowed.

HEY doesn’t feel worth $100/year

I’m broadly supportive of this era of subscriptions: I think it’s the best way to ensure that developers can continue improving on an app or service. But the flip side of that is that once a service doesn’t feel worth it any more, it’s time to cancel. To pay for a commodified app/service like email, there has to be a lot of value added and I don’t feel like HEY offers enough to continue paying for it.

I’ve spent the past week back on the Apple mail apps and while there’s some things I’ve missed about HEY, the positives outweigh the negatives. All for the price of free.

I’m not optimistic about 37signals' relationship with Apple and commitment to embracing its new and future technologies

DHH doesn’t really bother me like he bothers most people. I really truly appreciate his contrarian views–even though I don’t agree with most of his recent ones. I truly do not think he needs to be a bridge builder, but I also truly think he does not need to be a bridge burner. He was dealt a bum hand by Apple and has every right to be incensed, but there’s an anger there that makes me hesitant that 37signals will adopt Apple’s current and future technologies to the extent that I want them to.

The straw that broke the camel’s back here is Apple Intelligence. I’m still working through my feelings on what was announced at WWDC, but I’m not confident that 37signals will allow HEY to integrate with any of this and I at least want the option.

Goodbye HEY. You are a great idea that no longer quite works for me.

Happy WWDC day! No predictions, but one thing per platform that would make my life better:

iOS: APIs for launcher/clipboard apps like Alfred/Raycast/Quickbar
iPadOS: multi-user support
macOS: calendar sets in Calendar
visionOS: Microsoft Authenticator support
watchOS: New Siri watchface based on widget system
tvOS: Netflix support in the Up Next Queue
HomePod: Siri parity with other platforms
HomeKit: Matter 1.3 adoption

WWDC 2024: Watch online today at 10:00 a.m. PT.

Hit Man, 2023

this is the kind of large crowd-pleasing movie that-- 15 years ago-- would have topped the box office eight weeks in a row. So well directed, well written, well acted, and *fun* that it feels like it's from a different era. I wish I had watched this in a theater instead of Netflix

Slow Horses, Season 1: Started slow, but picked up towards the end of the second episode. First show in a while that was the exact amount of episodes it should be.

Current Things: June 2024

Currently Reading

Currently Watching

Currently In Queue

Currently Listening

  • Continuing the trend of all my favorites releasing albums way too close to each other: new Avett Brothers'!

Currently Planning

Concurrently

  • May was a bit of a weird month–we were insanely busy, but it was just a bunch of one-off events. I journaled about a lot of it, but didn’t blog much. I like that I have my journal where I feel comfortable capturing what I feel like, but I want to blog more. I need to adjust the line between public and private.
  • At our school auction we bid on and won a week at a house on the Eastern Shore. Since the school is always out for five days around Indigenous Peoples/Columbus Day (apparently our holiest of holidays), it’s always a good time to get out of the city. Looking forward to it!

Finished in May:

The White Lotus, Season 2: so great at unpacking so many ideas:

  • the transactional nature of how we live our lives and how it’s always a choice
  • how the stories we tell ourselves are truer than the facts
  • power is desirable and serves a function, but holding onto it for its own sake is self defeating

Finished reading: Co-Intelligence by Ethan Mollick 📚 great overview of how AI can be currently used most effectively: as a partner in completing tasks rather than as an entity that completes the tasks itself. I appreciated that Mollick was enthusiastic about AI while remaining skeptical.

3 Body Problem, Season 1: I liked this more than I thought I would– it’s made really well and did just enough thematically to remain interesting. I wish this had been a smidge more subtle and spent a tiny bit more time on its critique of religion.

Finished reading: Extremely Hardcore by Zoë Schiffer 📚 This is ostensibly an account of the downfall of Twitter, but I fear this same story is about to be retold over and over. Schiffer does a great job of anchoring the story in non-Elon characters. So while it’s long, it goes fast and smooth.

Civil War: I mostly liked this, but it felt just a bit off. It works way better as a plea for the necessity of journalism and documentation than as some kind of reflection of current times.

The full-on Tarantino-style ending–while satisfying– undercut the stillness of the rest of the movie

Previously, in Current Things…

May 2024
April 2024
March 2024
February 2024
January 2024
December 2023
November 2023
October 2023
September 2023
August 2023
July 2023
June 2023
May 2023
April 2023
March 2023
February 2023
January 2023
December 2022
November 2022

The White Lotus, Season 2: so great at unpacking so many ideas:

  • the transactional nature of how we live our lives and how it’s always a choice
  • how the stories we tell ourselves are truer than the facts
  • power is desirable and serves a function, but holding onto it for its own sake is self defeating

The thing I’m most heartened by today is the sheer bravery of the people on this jury. There’s a good chance this will materially affect their lives for the worse, yet they still did what they thought was right.

That’s some real heroics

Finished reading: Co-Intelligence by Ethan Mollick 📚 great overview of how AI can be currently used most effectively: as a partner in completing tasks rather than as an entity that completes the tasks itself. I appreciated that Mollick was enthusiastic about AI while remaining skeptical.

Julie took the kids to spend the night at her sister’s (and— very generously— to give me a night by myself!). Been going through Casey Johnston’s She’s A Beast book/newsletter and waiting for the (currently in a rain delay) Cardinals' game to start before making dinner.

It’s been the perfect night.

Matt Yglesias in his May 22nd Slow Boring Newsletter:

the liberal fear of Trump as an aspirational dictator is part of what rightists like and admire about him. They’re not exactly saying he’ll be a good type of dictator. But they are saying they need a fighter, a tough guy, a guy who can battle a rigged system and win – and it’s good that liberals fear him

Fear mongering about Trump’s authoritarianism is counterproductive. His age, his decorum, and– outside of his immigration stance– his policies are unpopular. If you want to beat Trump, focus on these things (especially his policies!)

Julie starting the day by flying a little too close to the sun

A single air pod sitting loose on a kitchen counter right next to its case

The time has come for the [Cardinals] to get younger…it’s time to move on from guys like Paul Goldschmidt and Nolan Arenado. The Cardinals went after them to try and build a winner. It didn’t work out, and they need to accept that.

This is true, but it’s only part of the story. There’s something very wrong with the Cardinals' talent system– my guess is it’s with development, but there’s probably some blame on recognition, as well.

The Cardinals' window to win has been shut

Not to put this energy out there on micro @camp eve, but this is 100% the correct ruling. Anything that has a distinct outer layer and a distinct inner layer is a sandwich.

Tacos: sandwich
Burritos: sandwich
Hot Dogs: sandwich
Quesadilla: sandwich
Corn dog: sandwich

Are tacos and burritos sandwiches? A judge in Indiana ruled yes.

3 Body Problem, Season 1: I liked this more than I thought I would– it’s made really well and did just enough thematically to remain interesting. I wish this had been a smidge more subtle and spent a tiny bit more time on its critique of religion.

Finished reading: Extremely Hardcore by Zoë Schiffer 📚 This is ostensibly an account of the downfall of Twitter, but I fear this same story is about to be retold over and over. Schiffer does a great job of anchoring the story in non-Elon characters. So while it’s long, it goes fast and smooth.

This morning’s iPad event feels like a turning point in my personal computer usage. In the Venn diagram of Apple products, my iPad usage increasingly doesn’t have an exterior to the circle. For my usage, other products can do what the iPad does much better. I love the iPad. I’m hoping Apple can tell me why

Apple’s ‘Let Loose’ event live blog: iPads all the way down